Category Archives: Uncategorized

Everything Enrollees Should Know About This Year’s Changes in Medicare

Since there are changes in Medicare all the time, it is essential for all beneficiaries to stay informed regardless of how minor the changes from the previous year might be. 2019 has brought in many variations including an early close in the Donut Hole, expansion in Medicare Advantage, and changes in premiums and deductibles. Also, Medicare is eliminating all “Cadillac” Medicare Supplement plans (including F and C) as a way to save money as the baby boomers come into the Medicare system at a rate of 10,000 every day.

High Volume of Enrollees

In 2020 it is expected that the Medicare costs will double due to the amount of retiring baby boomers. At this point, there will be more people on Medicare than paying in. For Medicare to save money in the future, it must make changes in Plans or rule them out for new beneficiaries. Medicare taxes and the Trust Fund continue to cover less since health care costs are rising faster than economic growth.

Plans F and C

2019 marks the last year for Plans F and C. On January 1, 2020; these plans will no longer be available to new enrollees. In 2015 the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) was passed to prohibit the sale of Medigap plans that pay for Part B deductibles. If a beneficiary already has Plan C or F you can continue to purchase these plans after the New Year. People that already have these plans are “grandfathered” in, but we have found that when plans close to new enrollees, the likely outcome is rate increases on the premium at a faster volume and rate than open plans.

Part B

In 2018 the standard premium for Medicare Part B was $134 a month and had gone up to $135.50. Some Enrollees will pay less because their premium amount depends on their Social Security Cost of Living Adjustment, which may not cover the increase.

Previously, the highest income bracket for Part B enrollees was $160k and above. This year a new bracket of $500k and above was added with a premium of $460.50 a month.

The deductible has increased from $183 to $185 per year, and once you meet this, then you are responsible for 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for services. This exposure has no cap- if you go in for major surgery, you will pay 20% unless you have a Medicare Supplement or Advantage plan to ease the burden.

Medigap plans that cover the Part B deductible can be sold in 2019 but can no longer be purchased starting 2020. Those who already have these programs can keep Plans C and F, but no new enrollees can buy plans that cover the Part B deductible.

Medicare Advantage

Test drives

Once enrolled in the Medicare Advantage plan, beneficiaries will now be able to try it out for three months, and if they aren’t satisfied, they can switch plans.

Open Enrollment

Starting this year from January 1st to March 31st anyone enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan can switch plans. New beneficiaries with both Medicare Part A and B plans have a three-month Medicare Advantage Enrollment period.

Broader Span of Coverage

Additional services are available within Medicare Advantage plans including coverage on meal deliveries and transportation services.

The Donut Hole

The Donut Hole is gradually closing due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In the past, Medicare beneficiaries experienced higher costs on medications at a certain point in the year due to a gap in coverage. At one point it was 100%. Since the beginning of 2019, the Medicare donut hole only affects generic medications. Beneficiaries will now save money by just paying 37% of those costs while in the donut hole.

Part A

Premiums for people whose work history (or spouses) isn’t 40 quarters are required to pay dividends for Part A coverage (hospitalization costs). Premiums for 30-40 quarters of work history have gone from $232 a month to $240. For less than 30 quarters it was $422 and is now $437. For all enrollees, every benefit period, Part A deductibles increase, though most beneficiaries have coverage that pays for all or part of it.

 

Every year there are changes in premiums and deductibles, but Medicare is striving to make changes for the better. Some parts that have improved the system include the removal of the therapy cap, an updated handbook, and a broadening of telehealth programs. For any questions about these topics or an expansion on changes in the donut hole, Part B, Part A or Medicare advantage, please leave a comment or give our Medicare Experts a call. We aim to be your educational Medicare resource!

Understanding Part D

Part D may feel difficult to understand, but it is a very important element to grasp an full understanding of.  The very first thing to understand is that having a yearly review considering your Part  D plan is vital. It is vital because your Part D plan can change on a yearly basis.  Your medication, dosage, provider’s location, and cost may change on the since last year.

Medication has tiers ranging from big name brands to generic brands. The cost, and tier requirements may change in which you may benefit or pay extra for the same drugs.   When speaking to our experts at Senior Health Medicare, we will not only review your current Part D plan, but we will put together a plan that will give you the same coverage with the best prices. 9 times out of 10 you and your spouse do not share the exact medication, to combat that our experts will create an individual plan for you and your spouse.

Call us now- before October 15th to get an appointment with our advisers. Enter your medications into our Part D Analysis form on the website. We will do a FREE drug plan comparison and recommend the plan with lowest out of pocket cost based on your medications.

Part D Analysis form: https://seniorhealthmedicare.com/health-ins-form2.php

7 Medicare Tips for New Enrollees

1 Medicare doesn’t have a family plan

Medicare plans are only individual coverage, not family. This means that spouses each need to have their own Medicare coverage. Additionally, no dependents receive coverage. In the event that your spouse is younger than you, when you enroll in Medicare they can seek employer coverage or individual coverage through the marketplace (healthcare.gov — the Affordable Care Act website). Note, that if you and your spouse are entering Medicare around the same time, you may be recommended different plans from different companies if they are a better individual fit for you. Some companies to offer household discounts for enrolling with the same company, but other than that it is unique to the individual.

2 There is no cap on out-of-pocket costs in Original Medicare

Most employer plans have annual limits on your out-of-pocket health expenses. Medicare pays 80% of approved medical expenses, then the beneficiary is responsible for the remaining 20%, without a cap. For example, if you have an $100K surgery, you will have to pay $20K, which is why people buy Medicare Supplement plans or Medigap plans to fill this gap.

3 Make a plan for any pending procedures

If your employer plan offers you better benefits than Medicare or costs less, then you may want to have the elective surgery sooner than later. Or wait until you are enrolled in the Medicare system. Surprisingly, the first year for a Medicare beneficiary usually has the highest number of claims because people wait for elective surgery until they are covered on the system.

4 Observation VS  Inpatient 

Medicare pays different rates according to status. Even if the patient is admitted in a hospital for one week, if they are under “observation” they are considered as out-patients.  Medicare requires a three-day hospital inpatient stay minimum before the covering of cost. When a patient is admitted under “observation” , the time frame is not counted toward the Medicare’s requirement regardless of the length.

5 Research can mean more money in your pockets

In the employer health insurance world, you are stuck with the benefits designed for the group. With Medicare, it should be custom to you and your individual needs. Finding an educational resource to learn more about Medicare and how it works, will only help you make smarter decisions when it comes to health insurance. It can also mean saving money in the process.

6 When you enroll into a Medicare Advantage plan, you are disenrolling from Original Medicare

Medicare Advantage plans were introduced in the early 2000’s as an alternative to Original Medicare parts A and B. The way they are marketed is that they offer the same benefits as Original Medicare, but it’s a little more complex than that. While Original Medicare and Medicare Supplement plans are programs regulated by the government, Medicare Advantage plans are controlled by the insurance companies. It literally takes an act of Congress to change Original Medicare, whereas Medicare Advantage plans are  in the company’s hands. You essentially give up your Medicare to work with a network provider. Learn more about the difference between Medicare Advantage and Original Medicare with a Supplement here.

7 You can change your Medicare Supplement coverage whenever you want

You don’t have to wait for AEP to change your Medicare Supplement coverage. You can change your Medigap plan anytime during the year, as long as you can pass medical underwriting. The programs that must wait for changes until AEP are Part D Prescription plans and Medicare Advantage plans.

 

Leave a comment, let us know which tip is the most useful.

4 Ways to Navigate Medicare

Medicare is not the easiest system to understand let alone to navigate. Here is a few quick facts to make sure you are setting yourself up for major success.

1 If you are currently covered by group employer insurance, you can defer receiving Medicare as long as you want. Once again, this is ONLY if you are covered by employer insurance.

2 Individuals turning 65 years old have six months for the initial enrollment period where underwriting is not a requirement in the process of Medicare. Even though we all love underwriting, this time period allow the process to run even smoother.

3 The initial period is the 3 months prior to your birthday, your actual birthday, and the 3 month post your 65th birthday.  It may seem like a long time now, but those 6 months will pass you if you are not paying attention.

4 If you recently stop receiving employer insurance and over 65 years old, you have a 8 month period after your insurance was discontinued called the Special enrollment period. For example, if your insurance was discontinued in May your special enrollment period will end in December.

Leave a comment,

For more information, click the link below

http://time.com/money/4496115/5-tips-medicare-tips-new-retirees/

Making Medicare Simple and Easy

If you ever wanted a personal assistant, especially with the confusing world of Medicare, My Medicare.gov is an amazing tool! My Medicare.gov is a free, secure, online portal that manages your personalized information regarding Medicare benefits and services. It is very simple to set-up, and can be used to check  information about your coverage, enrollment status and Medicare claims.

You can make getting all the necessary information about your coverage, prescription drugs, and health records easy for your doctor and any doctor you may need in the future. You never know when you’ll need to see a doctor while traveling. As you may know, not every doctor has your personal list of medications. This tool allows you to have everything you need at your finger tips.

According to sources at eHealth Medicare, your personal information is protected by the CMS.  The CMS is the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services,  The CMS has many guidelines such as, what type of information is being used, who is collecting the information, and how are they using the information collected.  This amazing tool has many other functions for your disposal, so give it try!

Leave a comment, and let us know what would you use My Medicare.gov for?

For more information, click the link below https://www.mymedicare.gov/

Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP)

6 Things You Should Do Before Medicare AEP Begins Oct. 15

Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP)

It’s that time of year again, the Annual Election Period (AEP) is upon us. If you’ve been a Medicare recipient prior to this year, then you are all too familiar with the implications of AEP. If this is your first enrollment season, then you’re about to experience what can be a frustrating and stressful time as a Medicare enrollee.

 

During the Medicare AEP, beneficiaries are able to alter their coverage under specific programs such as Medicare Advantage and Part D Prescription Drug plans. Often times, people make the mistake of thinking this is also the only time to change Medicare supplement plans, however those can be changed anytime throughout the year. The main things to focus on during AEP are switching from or to a Medicare Advantage plan, and entering into or changing your prescription drug plans.

 

You may be wondering why it is necessary to monitor these plans during the AEP, and the simple answer is that these plans change in coverage and price every year. If you don’t change or do anything to your existing plans, they will likely be much different in price and/or coverage as you enter into the next year. In many cases, the change can be significant. That’s why it’s always worth having your Medicare advisor analyze your existing plans and medications to ensure you’re still in the most cost-effective plan every year during AEP. Don’t wait, you could end up locked into a plan with a much higher premium or with holes in your coverage if you miss the AEP window (October 15th through December 7th).

 

In an effort to curb the stress and confusion that comes from Medicare AEP season, we’ve developed a list of 6 things that you should do to prepare.

 

  1. Confirm your eligibility. This is pretty obvious, but you must be eligible to enroll in Medicare plans. If you’re unsure of your eligibility, consult this article from the US Department of Health & Human Services website: http://www.hhs.gov/answers/medicare-and-medicaid/who-is-elibible-for-medicare/index.html

 

  1. Analyze your existing coverage thoroughly. Take some time to consider your past year of coverage. Weigh the pros and cons of the specific plan you’re in, the company/carrier of the plan, the total expenses (including prescription meds) of the year. Consider aspects like how quickly your claims were paid, if your doctor had any trouble with your insurance at any point, and if the out of pocket expenses were worth the healthcare you received.

 

  1. Make note of any changes in medication or health that could impact your plans. After you’ve done a thorough self-analysis of your past coverage, make sure to note any looming changes that could be upcoming in your health. For example, if your doctor suggested a new medication or treatment that wasn’t previously needed when you set up your original plan. Write this all out and give your coverage an overall satisfaction rating for the year. This will help determine what the next move for you should be, and will make you aware of what you need most out of your healthcare coverage.

 

  1. Compare prices of plan options for the coming year. There are MANY plans, programs, and carriers to choose from. When it comes time to select your coverage for the upcoming year, it’s essential to decide what type of Medicare beneficiary you are. Are you someone who would prefer to pay a little more on a monthly basis in exchange for peace of mind that you won’t have any unexpected expenses? Or would you rather pay a lower monthly premium and take the risk that your coverage may require high out-of-pocket expenses should you have a health issue? If you can answer this question for yourself, you’ll give a better starting point to determine what plan/program is a better fit and how much you will spend on said plan.

 

  1. Make a list of your current medications, dosages, and frequency. After analyzing the entirety of your coverage, the next step would be to write down every medication you take, the dosage, frequency, and brand. This list is going to guide your Part D plan selection.

 

  1. After completing steps 1-5, set an appointment with a Medicare advisor. After you’ve done the previous five steps, you have painted yourself a pretty thorough picture of your healthcare needs. Now it’s time to take this information to your Medicare advisor, so they can analyze and help you select the best coverage at the best price. Completing steps 1-5 prior to your call or appointment will make the process go much faster and smoother for you. *Helpful Tip: Always work with a non-captive Medicare advisor. They have access to all the plans and companies, not just one of them. This ensures you are in the best plan at the best price.

 

Remember, in order to ease the confusion, contact a Medicare representative to help make this AEP much smoother. If you don’t have a dedicated agent or aren’t sure, our toll-free Medicare hotline is open for questions, comments, concerns for anyone in the United States who needs consult on their Medicare plans/coverage at (888)-404-5049.

 

 

10 Things You Might Not Know About Medicare in the US

Doctor taking blood pressure of her smiling patient

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again, Medicare is confusing. Which is why we dedicate our lives to helping seniors PREPARE for Medicare before they enroll. Knowledge is power! So with that being said, here is a list of 10 things that you probably don’t know about Medicare, and some of them may surprise you!

 

  1. Medicare covers more than just senior citizens. Medicare is designed for the aging population, but under certain circumstances, people under the age of 65 can be enrolled. If you have a qualifying disability or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), you can get covered under Medicare.
  2. Baby boomers are aging into Medicare at a rate of 10,000 per day. Back when Medicare was first designed, people weren’t living nearly as long as they are today. Add that to the baby boomer generation who are rapidly aging into Medicare at a rate of 10,000 people PER DAY, and you can see how Medicare is quickly going to get into trouble.
  3. Enrollment can happen outside of AEP. There is a common misconception surrounding Medicare that you can’t change your plans unless it’s during the Annual Election Period (AEP) from October 15-December 7. While this is true for Medicare Advantage (Part C) and Prescription Drug Plans (Part D), you can change from Medicare supplement plan to plan anytime you want. There are always “special election periods” and change of status that can warrant a change outside of AEP as well.
  4. Each part of Medicare covers something different. While the parts of Medicare can be the most confusing part, it’s all for good reason. Each part of Medicare means something different and works differently. Part A is for your hospital care, Part B is for healthcare outside of the hospital such as routine doctors’ visits and preventive care, Part C is Medicare Advantage, and entirely different program from original Medicare altogether, and Part D is the prescription drug plan. Every part works differently to make one whole picture.
  5. How much Medicare actually pays out. Medicare supplemental insurance was created to fill in the coverage gaps left behind by original Medicare. Did you know that traditional Medicare only covers 80% of the Medicare-APPROVED costs? That means, YOU as the enrollee are responsible for that other 20%. This is where Medicare supplement insurance comes in. It covers your 20% if you keep up with your monthly premiums, and can save you a ton.
  6. A “non-participating” doctor still takes Medicare. Despite what the status title of “non-participating” doctors suggests, doctors under this status DO accept Medicare. They just don’t accept it at the amount that Medicare pays, meaning these doctors reserve the right to charge the patient additional money on top of what Medicare approves. While it seems confusing, don’t be too alarmed if your doctor becomes a “non-participator”- it just means that they reserve the right to charge you 15% more than Medicare approves. This is typically only found with specialty doctors/treatments.
  7. Waiting to enroll in Part D can cost you FOR LIFE. Once you’ve reached Medicare enrollment time, you also have to enroll in your Part D drug plan. If you don’t, you have to wait until the following AEP, AND Medicare charges a fee every month for the rest of the time you’re on Medicare (aka, the rest of your LIFE!) While the fee is minor, it can add up depending on your lifespan. 1% of the national average in premiums in what you pay PER month, so 12% per year, lasting forever.
  8. Medicare doesn’t cover everything. If you’ve been to your doctor for a physical and you WEREN’T charged for it, your doctor didn’t file it properly. Physicals and some other procedures aren’t covered under Medicare. While Medicare paired with a supplement covers almost everything, and mostly the big stuff, it doesn’t cover everything.
  9. Medicare doesn’t work outside the USA. Getting ready for a big vacation to Europe? Make sure you understand before you go that your traditional Medicare coverage doesn’t apply out of the country. If you have a Medicare supplement, you’re covered. However, traditional Medicare without a supplement or Medicare Advantage does NOT work outside the United States.
  10. On average, with Medicare you get WAY more than you pay for. While your Medicare premiums and co-pays do add up, compared to the average amount of usage, you are saving a TON. Medicare may not be perfect, but it is still possibly the greatest government healthcare coverage known to us. Take advantage of it by preparing yourself properly with a supplement so you don’t get stuck with huge bills, but rather a predictable monthly premium.

 

It’s true; Medicare is complex. But it’s one of the best working healthcare systems out there, and if used properly it can save enrollees a ton of money in their health care and keep them healthier, longer.

 

What is the Difference Between Medicare Part A and B?

Non captive agents help you get the best coverage at the best price

Ever wondered what all the different parts of Medicare actually mean? There are many terms and ideas associated with Medicare that are constantly thrown around, but do you truly know what they mean? Our blog is aiming to answer some of the common and consistent Medicare questions so that you can better understand the industry, and furthermore, your coverage.

 

So let’s dive in today with the basics: defining the two primary parts of original Medicare, Part A and Part B. We’ll get into Part C & D on another day.

 

Okay, so let’s start with the more basic Medicare Part A.

 

Medicare Part A

 

This is your hospital insurance. Any inpatient hospital stays, care received in a skilled nursing facility, hospice care, and some health care are covered under Medicare Part A. This is pretty straight forward; however, it can be more complex depending on your healthcare status and provider. Often times “under observation” can be a troublesome status for a patient covered under Medicare to have, because it can cause trouble with coverage. That’s a story for another day though, so for now, just remember that “Medicare Part A covers your stay” (in most cases).

 

Medicare Part B

 

Okay, so this is your actual health insurance coverage. This covers two types of medical services:

 

  • Preventive medical services such as flu shots, illness screenings, and the like, are considered preventive services. The lines here can become a bit blurred, but essentially, any sort of screenings or lab work that is done in an attempt to prevent major illness is considered preventive. Additionally, coverage can extend to necessary durable equipment like walkers or wheelchairs, when a diagnosis requires that.
  • Necessary treatment is covered when patients require treatment and care to treat conditions or illnesses. Included in this category are x-rays, lab work, outpatient services, and doctors visits that are necessary per your condition.

 

For part B, just remember it either helps prevent illness with preventive care coverage or treats an illness or condition.

 

If you don’t have a Medicare supplement plan in addition to your original Medicare coverage, then you are responsible for paying a deductible annually, as well as 20% of the Medicare-approved amount with participating providers. This 20% can really add up quickly, especially if you are being treated for a serious illness. This is why in most cases it makes sense to have a Medicare supplement plan to back up your original Medicare.

Well that in a nutshell is Medicare Part A and B. Stay tuned for more Medicare news, tips, and facts by following our blog or social channels.

The Medicare Crossroads: Do I Buy a Medicare Advantage or Medicare Supplement Plan?

Retired couple working on their laptop

Ah, the legendary question that every senior encounters nearing their 65th birthday and thereafter. Not only does each program have hundreds and hundreds of companies and plans to choose from, but the rules, networks, and coverage details can be extremely difficult to grasp.

 

Entering Medicare is a confusing, intimidating, and even vulnerable time, mostly because there are so many predatory insurance companies and salespeople vying for your dime. If you want to make the best Medicare decision possible that will support you when you need it and not break your bank account in the meantime, it’s critical for you to stay informed about all your options.  Like, for example, did you know that if you enroll into a Medicare Advantage plan, you are thereby dis-enrolling from original Medicare. They are two completely separate entities.

 

Let us help you on your journey as you navigate your way through the Medicare knowledge to be known. Here is our pros and cons breakdown of both Medicare Supplement (or Medigap) plans and Medicare Advantage plans.

We’ll start with Medicare Advantage.

 PROS

  • Medicare Advantage monthly premiums are fairly inexpensive. Some can cost $0 per month.
  • Part D drug plans are typically included. (*Note: This is a pro for convenience, not efficiency.)
  • Sometimes they include fitness memberships or other extra incentives.

CONS

  • Small and intricate medical networks determine your available medical providers. In many cases, you have to change your doctor to become “in-network” before your plan will cover claims.
  • You run the risk of VERY high out-of-pocket costs (OPCs) if you don’t remain perfectly healthy.
  • If your OPCs get too high due to illness or injury, you are unable to enter back into original Medicare and can get stuck paying the high OPCs forever.
  • Limited nationwide coverage due to network restrictions. Traveling becomes an issue because your insurance is usually not applicable at remote medical facilities. (*Note: The Mayo Clinic is one of those major hospitals that will NOT take Medicare Advantage plans.)

Medicare Advantage plans may be cheap, but as my mother always told me “you get what you pay for.” This is true with Medicare Advantage, or as we call it in our office Medicare DIS-Advantage. The cons almost ALWAYS outweigh the pros when it comes to a Medicare Advantage plan.

 

Next, the Medicare Supplement or “Medigap” plan.

 

PROS

  • Depending on your plan, almost everything is covered. Out-of-pocket costs (OPCs) are relatively low or non-existent.
  • Anytime you become eligible, you can enroll in a supplement plan, not just during the Annual Election Period (AEP).
  • Coverage is more predictable and easier to understand.
  • You can keep your doctor! Chances are, he or she accepts original Medicare and your corresponding supplement plan.
  • Almost always accepted when you travel nationwide.

CONS

  • Medicare supplement plans are more expensive than Medicare Advantage plans.

As you can see, Medicare supplement plans do cost more, however the coverage they provide is exemplary.

 

Let’s create an example. Two best friends, Jane and Beth, each chose coverage recommended to them by their insurance agents three months prior to their 65th birthdays. Jane was enrolled into a Plan G Medicare Supplement plan from Banker’s Fidelity at $183.47 per month. Beth decided to dis-enroll from original Medicare and enroll into a Humana Medicare Advantage plan at only $37 per month. As they compare their enrollments, Beth gloats about how much money she is saving for her coverage. Jane does wonder why her plan is so much more than Beth’s, but she trusts her advisor and believes in her decision.

 

Later that year, Jane discovers she has a rare form of curable cancer, and Beth also learns she has progressing heart disease. Both women are in and out of doctors’ and specialists’ offices. While Jane gets to keep seeing the doctors she knows and trusts during this scary time, Beth’s plan requires her to visit only in-network doctors and specialists, some who mandate traveling far from home.

 

A few months later, the women start receiving their doctors’ bills and statements. Beth is shocked and terrified to discover that she already owes thousands, and it’s continuing to add up. Her out-of-pocket maximum will eventually kick in, but it’s a high number. Beth is not only worried about the future of her health, but also her financial future.

 

Jane, on the other hand, doesn’t owe anything other than her premium. She can rest assured because the money she pays every month in premium protects her from unexpected costs and expenses. While she’s moving towards recovery of her health she can rest easy knowing her Medigap coverage will insulate her pocketbook.

 

Unbiased and Factual Medicare Presentations Available Year Round

Senior Health Medicare Presentations Overview

Unbiased and useful information is what viewers of our Medicare presentations can expect, always. With almost two decades of experience in Medicare, our presenters are the best of the best and can help you feel secure and informed when it comes to your Medicare insurance. If you’re a part of a group, association, retiree club, or credit union, this is a great FREE way to provide more benefits to your members.

On-Site Medicare Workshops

 If your group is located in the state of Michigan, or in the bordering states like Ohio or Indiana, we would be happy to hold an on-site Medicare workshop at your location or a location of your choice. We provide the lunch and the information, and your members benefit.

Virtual “Webinar-style” Medicare Workshops

Same information just presented virtually for those on-the-go or out of our region. Great way to get a feel for our presenters and style before committing to an in-person workshop. Also a great way to get the same valuable information on your time and schedule.

Choose from a list of intriguing topics like:

  • “Medicare 101: An Overview of the Medicare Benefit”
  • “Medicare Advantage versus Medicare Supplement”
  • “How the Affordable Care Act Will Effect Medicare in the Next 5 Years”
  • “How to Recognize and Avoid Medicare Scams”
  • “Understanding the Difference Between Part A and Part B”
  • “Part D Prescription Plans Made Clear”
  • “How to Choose the Right Medicare Supplement Plan”
  • And more! We can customize topics based on audience interest.

Our presentation calendar fills up quickly, so book your spot today! We recommend late summer/early fall time slots to make the best impact on your members right before the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP).

Call Cortney to set up your FREE Medicare presentation at (517) 304-3484 or email her at cpeters@seniorhealthmedicare.com